October 3 - October 24, 2018

Marianne Greco

Slow Food

"EVERYONE EATS & NOBODY HITS"

Points Total

  • 0 Today
  • 0 This Week
  • 1,144 Total

Participant Impact

  • up to
    80
    minutes
    spent exercising
  • up to
    240
    minutes
    spent learning
  • up to
    6
    locally sourced meals
    consumed
  • up to
    36
    meatless or vegan meals
    consumed
  • up to
    20
    whole food meals
    consumed

Marianne's Actions

Food

Reduce Animal Products

I will enjoy 1 meatless meal(s) and/or 1 vegan meal(s) each day this week.

COMPLETED 18
DAILY ACTIONS

Health

Exercise Daily

Exercise is a great stress blaster! I will exercise for 40 minute(s) each day.

COMPLETED 2
DAILY ACTIONS

Health

Take Control

Both system and personal sustainability are important! I will develop a plan with my medical professionals to achieve my best health and live my life to the fullest.

Completed
One-Time Action

Food

Whole Foods Diet

I will enjoy 1 meal(s) each day free of processed foods.

COMPLETED 20
DAILY ACTIONS

Food

Weekly Meal Planning

I will reduce food waste and save money by planning a weekly menu, only buying the ingredients I need.

COMPLETED 17
DAILY ACTIONS

Simplicity

De-Clutter My Home

I will de-clutter, clean, and donate or recycle unneeded items in my home.

COMPLETED 20
DAILY ACTIONS

Food

Buy From a Farmers Market

I will purchase produce and meat from a local farmers market or food co-op.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health

Support Pollution Reduction

I will spend at least 180 minutes learning about water and air quality issues in my area, how they are impacting human and environmental health, and how I can help.

Completed
One-Time Action

Health

Learn More about Food Deserts

I will spend 60 minutes learning about food deserts and find out how I can advocate for healthy and fresh food in my region.

Completed
One-Time Action

Feed


  • Marianne Greco 10/26/2018 1:12 PM
    This challenge gave me optimism. Knowing caring people are out there in the thousands was a powerful boost to my own personal efforts. And I learned so much from the folks that read, researched, and reflected during these few weeks. Onward!

  • Marianne Greco 10/25/2018 2:03 PM
    I considered myself an ECO pro before I started this challenge, but I learned so much and networked with several fantastic local and national organization I didn't know about. I already contacted a local food rescue group in my area that is mitigating a food desert less than 5 miles from where I live. Thanks for all the resources compiled for this challenge. I feel like I just took, in three intense weeks, the most important and relevant college course ever.

  • Marianne Greco 10/24/2018 1:34 PM
    For this challenge I had at first chosen actions  that I had already been focusing on, hoping to be more consistent and effective. The information, reflection questions and interactions with other ECO folks brought me deeper understanding into those actions and I did indeed ramp up my effort and commitment. As the days and weeks progressed, I was inspired to explore other actions.  This October challenge was very much worth the time spent researching and processing the ideas and information. It is so good to know I am part of real change.

  • Marianne Greco 10/24/2018 11:37 AM
    After this ECO challenge I will reduce screen time.
    Well, after the midterm elections, since I like to watch the media coverage.
    OK, that's the challenge: reduce screen time starting Nov 6.
    No... need time for late reporting precincts, so make it Nov 7.
    OK Nov 7 reduce screen time. 

  • Marianne Greco 10/24/2018 11:03 AM
    The hardest challenge was to exercise  40 minutes a day. I did not get that done. I think I will lower the time to 10 minutes three times a week and try to achieve that first.

  • Marianne Greco 10/24/2018 9:38 AM
     REDUCING WASTE at WORK
    Since I am the only person using the rest room on one side of the factory, I brought in a cotton hand towel from home to dry my hands, instead of using paper towels. I also bring a ceremic coffee mug, a metal water container, and a cloth napkin and metal utensils in my lunch box. This has reduced my contributions to the waste bin at work to zero!  

  • Marianne Greco 10/24/2018 8:59 AM
    WHOLE FOODS
    I have gone through all my favorite recipes and made them more healthy using a nutrition calculator and tweaking the ingredients. Just list the ingredients on this online calculator and the nutrition label for it is generated, Then tweak the recipe to bring down problem areas and bring up nutrition. Here is an example of how I edited a fairly good muffin mix to be even more healthy:
    image.png 350.31 KB


    Try the Nutrition Calculator here: https://www.verywellfit.com/recipe-nutrition-analyzer-4157076
  • Reflection Question
    Health Learn More about Food Deserts
    What are the implications of access to nutritious food for a community?

    Marianne Greco 10/23/2018 5:57 PM
    I found a fascinating organization called, FOOD RESCUE. I really can't say it any better:

    "Food insecurity causes poor health, emotional stress, and is a mental burden. It inhibits an adult’s ability to work and a child’s ability to learn. Hunger gnaws at the fabric of family life by forcing impossible choices among food, shelter, and safety. One in seven Americans is food insecure. Wherever you are, people in your community – friends, family, neighbors, or colleagues – do not have enough to eat. And yet, in the face of this crippling challenge, the volume of food supply thrown away every year is unfathomable."

    "Hunger isn’t an abstract problem, nor is it a mere inconvenience. It affects individuals – children, women, and men – on a fundamentally personal level. Without enough food, human beings cannot survive. And that threat to survival exists in the United States on a scale that cannot be ignored."

    I have just volunteered with the Northwest Connecticut chapter to ease the food desert problem in my area.
    image.png 34.28 KB

    Find your chapter here: https://foodrescue.us/the-solution/

  • Marianne Greco 10/23/2018 5:37 PM
    FOOD DESERTS & FOOD RESCUE
    In this challenge, I learned that Food deserts are places where it is difficult to buy fresh food. Defined by the USDA as "parts of the country vapid of fresh fruit, vegetables, and other healthful whole foods, usually found in impoverished areas," food deserts are largely due to a lack of grocery stores, farmers markets, and healthy food providers.

    The map shows where low-income census indicates where a significant number or share of residents is more than 1 mile (urban) or 10 miles (rural) from the nearest supermarket. I am ashamed to habe been be so so ignorant of the many many food deserts in my so-called affluent state.
    image.png 575.51 KB

    BUT IT IS NOT ALL BAD NEWS.
    I am learning about a concept called FOOD RESCUE. Every Friday morning Chris (a Community Plates food runner for almost a year now) rescues over a thousand pounds of fresh produce from an area wholesaler and delivers it to the East End Community Council in Bridgeport, CT.  Willene and Ted are community organizers there who make sure the food gets placed on tables and distributed to the hundreds of food insecure people who show up there every week. A community leader in Bridgeport is quoted as saying “do you realize what a big difference this is making?”
    image.png 830.21 KB


    BE PART OF A SOLUTION
    Hunger in the United States makes no sense because in our digitally connected world, bridging the gap between excess and access isn’t just possible. It’s simple. I am contacting my local group to volunteer. Read more here: https://foodrescue.us/the-solution/

    Find food deserts in your area here: https://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go-to-the-atlas.aspx#.UUDJLTeyL28

  • Marianne Greco 10/23/2018 5:02 PM
    ADVOCATE for the CLEAN AIR ACT
    Although I live away from congested cities, I was SHOCKED to learn that all but one county in Connecticut received a FAILING GRADE  from the American Lung Association "State of the Air 2018" report. The study says the number of people exposed to unhealthy levels of air pollution increased to nearly 134 million people, up from 125 million in their previous report.
    Furthermore, the authors said climate change contributed to worsening smog levels, particularly with record-setting heat.

     Numerous members of Congress in both the Senate and the House have announced their intention to introduce legislation that would block or delay the agency from reducing global warming emissions under the Clean Air Act. Legislators need to be challenged to keep the Clean Air Act intact, funded and enforced — something some lawmakers have targeted for repeal. I will be contacting my Sen. Blumenthal and Sen. Murphy. I hope you all will contact yours as well.
    Signing the Clean Air Act 1963

    More info here: https://www.ucsusa.org/our-work/global-warming/reduce-emissions/attack-clean-air-act
    Find your senators and representatives emails here: https://www.usa.gov/elected-officials
    Download the State of the Air Report here:  https://www.lung.org/local-content/california/our-initiatives/state-of-the-air/2018/state-of-the-air-2018.html